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MemberMaria Hayward

I am a professor in Early Modern History at the University of Southampton, where I have worked since 2008. Prior to this I was a member of the Textile Conservation Centre, Winchester School of Art, 1999-2009. My main research interests focus on textiles and clothing in the 16th and 17th centuries but they stretch beyond these boundaries into the late medieval and the 18th century. Having started working on the court of Henry VIII, my interests have extended outwards.

MemberGiovanni Gasbarri

Postdoctoral Fellow (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Center for the Study of Christianity, October 2017) Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow (University of Toronto, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, September 2016) Postdoc in History of Medieval Art (Università di Urbino “Carlo Bo”, Urbino, March 2016) Visiting Professor (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, 2015-2016) Teaching Fellow (Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome) Postdoc in History of Medieval Art (Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, 2014-2015) Phd in History of Byzantine Art (Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, June 2013) Webmaster for the official website of AISB – Associazione Italiana di Studi Bizantini http://www.studibizantini.it — RESEARCH INTERESTS — * Medieval art and architecture in Italy; * Early Christian, Byzantine and Medieval ivory carvings; * Byzantine book illumination; visual rhetoric and relation between text and image; * History of Medieval and Byzantine studies at the turn of the twentieth century; * Impact of the Grand Tour on the rediscovery of medieval and Byzantine art between the 18th and the 19th centuries; * Fakes, forgeries, copies; * Collections and collectors of early Christian, Byzantine and Medieval works of art.

MemberTiffany DeRewal

Ph.D. Candidate in English at Temple University (18th-19th c. American Literature and Medical Humanities) and Writing Instructor at Rowan University I am pursuing a PhD in English literature at Temple University. My dissertation, “The Resurrection and the Knife: Protestantism, Nationalism, and the Invention of the Cadaver During the Rise of American Medicine” focuses on the intersection between gothic fiction, medical historiography, and religious ideology in the early American republic, with particular attention to the cadaver as it is created in cultural, medical, and spiritual discourse. This research unites my interests in the social history of medicine and the dynamics of the religious imagination in the 18th and 19th century United States. Research Interests: 19th c. American literature, literature and history in the early American republic, the medical humanities, gothic literature, spirituality and science Teaching Interests: writing across disciplines, writing with technology, digital research methods and pedagogy

MemberPaulo Jorge Oliveira Leitão

Paulo Jorge Oliveira Leitão, 18/02/1961, Lisbon, Portugal. Librarian at Art Library, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal. Teacher at FCSH, Nova University, Lisbon, Portugal. Master in Information Management and Curation. Doctoral student, doctoral programe in Portugueses Contemporary History, FCSH, Nova University, Lisbon, Portugal. Thesis subject: municipalities in 19th-century Portugal.

MemberNancy Um

Nancy Um is professor of art history at Binghamton University. She received her MA and PhD in art history from UCLA. Her research explores the Islamic world from the perspective of the coast, with a focus on material, visual, and built culture on the Arabian Peninsula and around the rims of the Red Sea and Indian Ocean. Her first book The Merchant Houses of Mocha: Trade and Architecture in an Indian Ocean Port (University of Washington Press, 2009) relies upon a cross-section of visual, architectural, and textual sources to present the early modern coastal city of Mocha as a space that was nested within wider world networks, structured to communicate with far-flung ports and cities across a vast matrix of exchange. Her second book, Shipped but not Sold: Material Culture and the Social Order of Trade during Yemen’s Age of Coffee (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017), explores the material practices and informal social protocols that undergirded the overseas trade in 18th C Yemen. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, African Arts, Northeast African Studies, Journal of Early Modern History, Genre: Forms of Discourse and Culture, Art History, and Getty Research Journal. She has received research fellowships from the Fulbright program, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Getty Foundation, and the American Institute for Yemeni Studies.

MemberAmelia Rauser

I’m a specialist in 18th-century European visual culture, especially in Great Britain. My first book examined the origins of political caricature; my current research project centers on the history of fashion. “Living Statues: Neoclassical Culture and Fashionable Dress in the 1790s– London, Paris, Naples,” is a study of the radical style of undress in the 1790s and its connection to contemporary aesthetic, political, and scientific thought.

MemberSabrina Ferri

Sabrina Ferri is Associate Professor of Italian at the University of Notre Dame. Her research encompasses Italian literature, philosophy, science and visual arts of the so-called “long eighteenth century,” with a focus on the transition to modernity and Italy’s place in transnational contexts. Her work on Giacomo Casanova, Lazzaro Spallanzani, the late eighteenth-century Picturesque, Vittorio Alfieri, Giambattista Vico, and Giacomo Leopardi has appeared in several peer-reviewed journals. Her first book, Ruins Past: Modernity in Italy, 1744-1836, was published in the Voltaire Foundation’s series “Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment” in 2015. Through the analysis of the representation of ruins by Italian writers, scientists, and artists between the mid-eighteenth and early nineteenth century, Ruins Past explores the culture of the period and traces Italy’s uneasy transition into modernity. She is currently working on Giacomo Leopardi and on two long-term projects. The first, Fantasy’s Forge. Brain and the Imagination between Enlightenment and Romanticism, focuses on Italian writers and scientists between the mid-18th and the early 19th century, and seeks to tell the interdisciplinary story of a crucial moment in the history of the imagination, when science, poetry, and philosophy converged to reshape the understanding of this faculty. The second, Revolutionary States and the Ends of Fiction. History, Italy, and the Novel (1799-1967), is a study of the representation of historical change and in particular of political revolutions in novels set in Italy during the late 18th and 19th centuries.

MemberMargaret Samu

Margaret Samu works on 18th- and 19th-century European art and design with a special interest in the intersection between Russian and Western cultures. She earned her Ph.D. at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts after receiving her Bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College in Art History and French. Her work has been published internationally, in journals such as Искусствознание, Nineteenth-Century Studies, and Эксперимент/Experiment, as well as a volume she co-edited, From Realism to the Silver Age (Northern Illinois University Press, 2014). She has presented lectures and conference papers on her work in Russia, England, the United States, and Canada, and has received grants from the Mellon Foundation, the Fulbright Program, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Library of Congress, among other institutions. Dr. Samu is currently working on a book-length project titled Russian Venus. She served as president of the Society of Historians of East European, Eurasian, and Russian Art and Architecture (SHERA) from 2013 until 2015.

MemberAshley Gardini

Ashley Gardini is an art historian specializing in modern Italian architecture. Her initial research focused on Antonio Sant’Elia and the development of Italian Futurist architecture. That evolved into analyzing the influence of Italian Futurist architecture during both the interwar and post-World War II periods. Now she has expanded her focus to looking beyond the role of Italian Futurism. Her work was presented at the 33rd annual conference of the American Association of Italian Studies. It has since been published in both the 2017 and 2018 editions of the Yearbook of Futurism Studies. Her current active areas of research interests are:

  • Italian Futurist architecture.
  • Women in architecture during the Fascist era.
  • 1950s and 1960s Italian architecture and design.

In addition to academic research, Ashley Gardini teach both art history and architectural history at community colleges in the San Francisco Bay Area.