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MemberMehl Penrose

Spanish literature (1700-contemporary), Queer Studies and Theory, Gender Studies (in particular, Masculinity Studies), Post-modernism, Reception Theory, German philosophical influences on 19th-century Spanish cultural discourse, and the intersections of law, medicine, science, culture, art, and literature in 18th- and 19th-century Spanish discourse.

MemberErvin Malakaj

I am Assistant Professor of German Studies at the University of British Columbia. Prior to my appointment at UBC, I served as Assistant Professor of German and Coordinator of the German Program at Sam Houston State University. I received my Ph.D. in Germanic Languages and Literatures and Film & Media Studies at Washington University in St. Louis (2015) and hold a B.A. (2007) and M.A. (2009) in German Studies from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

I specialize in late-18th to 21st-century German media and cultural history. In particular, my research focuses on 19th-century literary cultures, film history (Imperial Germany, Weimar Germany, cinema of the 60s and 70s), narrative theory, queer theory, and critical pedagogy.

Currently, I am writing a book examining the influence of fluctuating literary markets on authorial agency and narrative form provisionally titled Fragile Literary Cultures in Early Imperial Germany. Part and parcel of this research is my work on a volume titled The Becoming and Afterlife of Literature: Agents in the German Literary Field (co-edited with Vance Byrd).

My scholarship in film studies includes a book project examining the primacy of melodramatic form in the articulation of queer experiences in popular culture and the intellectual sphere of Weimar Germany. In addition, I am completing an article, which examines the queer potential of slapstick in Ernst Lubitsch’s early comedies. This article is part of my work on an edited volume titled An Interdisciplinary Companion to Slapstick Cultures (co-edited with Alena Lyons and under advanced contract with de Gruyter).

In 2016, I co-founded the international scholarly collective “Diversity, Decolonialization, and the German Curriculum” (DDGC). Following DDGC’s inaugural conference March 2017 at the University of North Carolina, Asheville, DDGC has been institutionalized into a biannual conference (the next conference will take place Spring 2019 at St. Olaf College). I also serve as the co-editor of DDGC’s official blog.

MemberKarin Anneliese Wurst

Karin A. Wurst, is Professor of German Literature and Culture. She received her Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. Her books have focused on representations of the family, women’s drama, cultural consumption in 18th Century-Germany, and J.M.R. Lenz : Das Schlaraffenland verwilderter Ideen. Narrative Strategien in den Prosaerzählungen von J. M. R. Lenz (Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2014); Fabricating Pleasure: Fashion, Entertainment, and Consumption in Germany (1780-1830), German Literary Theory and Cultural Studies (Wayne State University Press, 2005). Karin A. Wurst and Alan Leidner, Unpopular Virtues: J. M. R. Lenz and the Critics. A Reception History (Columbia, S.C.: Camden House, 1999). Edited and introduced Eleonore Thon’s “Adelheit von Rastenberg.” Texts and Translation Series. (New York: MLA, 1996). Edited and introduced J.M.R. Lenz als Alternative? Positionsanalysen zum 200. Todestag (Köln, Wien, Weimar: Böhlau, 1992). Frau und Drama im achtzehnten Jahrhundert (Köln, Wien: Böhlau, 1991). “Familiale Liebe ist die wahre Gewalt.” Zur Repräsentation der Familie in Lessings dramatischem Werk” (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1988). Her articles focus on 17th and 18th century Germany and issues of gender, cultural and aesthetic representation. The have appeared in German Quarterly, Daphnis, German Studies Review, Lessing Yearbook, Text + Kritik, Seminar, Women in German Yearbook, Goethe Yearbook, Lenz Jahrbuch.  Her teaching interests include literary and cultural theories, feminist theory, women’s literature and material culture. From 2006 to 2014 she served as Dean of the College of Arts and Letters at MSU; she served as Special Advisor to the Provost on Intercultural Learning and Student Engagement (2014-2016).  

MemberDonald Haase

My research on German, French, English, and American fairy tales, folktales, literature, and film spans topics from the 18th century to the present. I am general editor of the Series in Fairy-Tale Studies published by Wayne State University Press and former editor of the international journal Marvels & Tales: Journal of Fairy-Tale Studies. I serve on the editorial board of Marvels & Tales and on the advisory boards of Fairy Tale Review, Gramarye, Dzieciństwo: Literatura i Kultura, and the Chichester Centre for Fairy Tales, Fantasy, and Speculative Fiction.

MemberAnne Fuchs

Anne Fuchs studied German and English Literature at the University of Konstanz, Trinity College Dublin and the Freie Universität Berlin. Her PhD examined the role of humour in the works of the Swiss writer Robert Walser. Between ‌1992-2010 she was Lecturer, Senior Lecturer and then Professor of Modern German Literature and Culture at University College Dublin where she co-founded the UCD Humanities Institute in 2002, funded by the Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions in Ireland (PRTLI 3). From 2002 – 2007 she was Principal Investigator of the five-year Research Programme “German Memory Contests since 1945”, funded by PRTLI3. In 2005/6 she received an IRCHSS Senior Research Fellowship, which enabled her to carry out research for her fourth monograph Phantoms of War in Contemporary German Literature, Films and Discourse. The award of a UCD Senior Fellowship in 2010 helped her to complete her research on After the Dresden Bombing: Pathways of Memory, 1945 to the Present. In 2011 she accepted the Chair and Professorship of German at the University of St Andrews before moving to Warwick in January 2012. She was a Fellow of the Max Planck research group Memory and History, University of Constance and guest researcher at the Kulturwissenschaftliche Kolleg, Universität Konstanz in 2014. She returned to UCD in September 2016 to assume the Directorship of the UCD Humanities Institute. She is a Member of the Royal Irish Academy and in 2014 she was elected a Fellow of the British Academy.Research interests
Memory studies (in particular German politics of memory since 1945); German literature in the 20th and 21st centuries; German-Jewish literature; Modernism; the cultural history of walking; time and temporality in the digital era.Her current research concerns the experience of historical acceleration at the beginning of the 21 century. The inability to determine the speed of social and economic developments through conventional legislation and planning in western democracy was underlined by the events in the wake of the financial crash of 2008. Indeed, the premium placed on speed and the constant drive towards innovation raise the question of how cultural connectedness to places and traditions can be assured under such radically new conditions. She was co-organiser (with Jonathan Long, Durham University) of an international conference on Faster than Light? Historical Experience, Placed Identity and Memory in the Age of Historical Acceleration which was held at the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Warwick from 7 – 9 March 2012. And The Longing for Time: Ästhetische Eigenzeit in Contemporary German Literature, Film and Art, held at the Kulturiwssenschaftliche Kolleg, Universität Konstanz , 15-17 May 2014 in collaboration with Prof. Aleida Assmann.