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DepositRelationelle adjektiver på dansk / Relational adjectives in Danish

ENGLISH ABSTRACT Due to their special properties, relational adjectives (in particular when serving as classifying modifiers) have been the subject of detailed investigations in many languages, including Russian, French, Spanish, Swedish, Dutch and German, but they are not mentioned in Danish reference grammars. The main goal of this article is to show that Danish also has a class of relational adjectives and to argue that they should be given their rightful place in future grammatical descriptions of the Danish language. DANSK RESUMÉ På grund af deres særlige egenskaber har relationelle adjektiver (navnligt når de fungerer som klassificerende modifikatorer) tiltrukket detaljerede beskrivelser i mange sprog, herunder russisk, fransk, spansk, svensk, hollandsk og tysk, men de er ikke nævnt i opslagsværker over det danske sprog. Formålet med denne artikel er at demonstrere, at dansk også har en gruppe af relationelle adjektiver samt at argumentere for, at relationelle adjektiver fortjener en plads i fremtidige beskrivelser af det danske sprog.

Deposit100 anos da revolução russa: ensinamentos da atuação dos anarquistas

O presente artigo procura apresentar, nos 100 anos de comemoração da Revolução Russa, uma análise histórica da participação anarquista nos processos pré-revolução e durante os anos de Comunismo de Guerra. Em um segundo momento, a pesquisa busca descrever o principal movimento anarquista durante a Revolução Russa, ou seja, a atuação de Nestor Ivánovitch Makhno e seu Exército Negro na Ucrânia.

DepositDonald Colongeli, oral history audio, 9/25/2017

Interviewee: Donald A. Colongeli Interviewer: Kortnee Gilmore, Alex Gerstle, Matthew Henry Date: September 25, 2017 Location: SUNY Cortland History Department, Cortland, New York Length: 52:53 Mr. Donald Colongeli has lived in Cortland for all of his life. He is the child of two Italian immigrants. His father arrived in the United States when we was 17 and his mother came when she was 16. Mr. Colongeli also has 3 brothers, two of the have unfortunately passed on, but all of them, including Donald, served in combat. Mr. Colongeli was scheduled to go to both Korea and Vietnam during their respective conflicts, but never saw combat, for which he is thankful. Mr. Colongeli is married and has three children, Jim, Susan and Don. He has owned several businesses in the Cortland area during the time of the Wickwire factory, but he is mostly proud of his food supply service which shipped foods and ingredients both across the country and internationally. Mr. Colongeli also ran for public office in Cortland at one time. His wife’s father worked at the Wickwire factory and his wife recalls hearing stories of the factory and some of the incidents that happened there, including a time when a man was pressed in-between one of the cranes. Mr. Colongeli had an interaction with Chester Wickwire at one point in his life when he sold him a pair of shoes. He recalls how large the Wickwire factory was and how it employed many people in the Cortland area. He also recalls all of the various nationalities that were in the area during his childhood, including families from Italy, Russia and Poland. Mr. Colongeli also recalls stories that his wife told him about how her father would bring home fellow coworkers from the Wickwire factory for dinner and homemade wine. The city of Cortland remains a very important element to Mr. Colongeli and he remains optimistic that the city will one day return to the way it was before.

DepositDonald Colongeli, oral history transcript, 9/25/2017

Interviewee: Donald A. Colongeli Interviewer: Kortnee Gilmore, Alex Gerstle, Matthew Henry Date: September 25, 2017 Location: SUNY Cortland History Department, Cortland, New York Length: 52:53 Mr. Donald Colongeli has lived in Cortland for all of his life. He is the child of two Italian immigrants. His father arrived in the United States when we was 17 and his mother came when she was 16. Mr. Colongeli also has 3 brothers, two of the have unfortunately passed on, but all of them, including Donald, served in combat. Mr. Colongeli was scheduled to go to both Korea and Vietnam during their respective conflicts, but never saw combat, for which he is thankful. Mr. Colongeli is married and has three children, Jim, Susan and Don. He has owned several businesses in the Cortland area during the time of the Wickwire factory, but he is mostly proud of his food supply service which shipped foods and ingredients both across the country and internationally. Mr. Colongeli also ran for public office in Cortland at one time. His wife’s father worked at the Wickwire factory and his wife recalls hearing stories of the factory and some of the incidents that happened there, including a time when a man was pressed in-between one of the cranes. Mr. Colongeli had an interaction with Chester Wickwire at one point in his life when he sold him a pair of shoes. He recalls how large the Wickwire factory was and how it employed many people in the Cortland area. He also recalls all of the various nationalities that were in the area during his childhood, including families from Italy, Russia and Poland. Mr. Colongeli also recalls stories that his wife told him about how her father would bring home fellow coworkers from the Wickwire factory for dinner and homemade wine. The city of Cortland remains a very important element to Mr. Colongeli and he remains optimistic that the city will one day return to the way it was before.

Deposit“The Aesthetic Terrain of Settler Colonialism: Katherine Mansfield and Anton Chekhov’s Natives” (2018)

While Anton Chekhov’s influence on Katherine Mansfield is widely acknowledged, the two writers’ settler colonial aesthetics have not been brought into systematic comparison. Yet Chekhov’s chronicle of Sakhalin Island in the Russian Far East parallels in important ways Mansfield’s near-contemporaneous account of colonial life in New Zealand. Both writers were concerned with a specific variant of the colonial situation: settler colonialism, which prioritises appropriation of land over the governance of peoples. This essay considers the aesthetic strategies each writer developed for capturing that milieu in their travel writings within the framework of the settler colonial aesthetics that has guided much anthropological engagement with endangered peoples.

DepositNarrating and mapping Russia: From Terra Incognita to a charted space on the road to Cathay

In the 16th century most of Russia is still a terra incognita with a highly dubious and mostly mythologized geography, anthropology, and sociology. In this article we look at some texts of the Early Modern period – Sir Thomas Smithes Voiage and Entertainment in Rushia (1605), Peter Mundy’s Travel Writings of 1640–1641, and The Voiages and Travels of John Struys (1676–1683) – and try to uncover the transformation of the obscure country into a more or less charted space, filled with narratives of adventures and travels in an enigmatic land on the verge of Europe, where exotic cultures are drawn together in a flamboyant mix. It is travel narrative that actually charts the territory and provides an explanation from which stems a partial understanding, physical and cultural, of the “Land of the Unpredictable.”

DepositThrough the Opaque Veil: The Gothic and Death in Russian Realism

This chapter examines nineteenth-century Russian writers who drew on the Gothic in order to explore the experience of death, existential terror, and the possibility of an afterlife within the bounds of literary realism. In Turgenev’s story ‘Bezhin Meadow’ and Chekhov’s sketch ‘A Dead Body’, Gothic language and imagery create a narrative frame that contextualizes an encounter between peasants and a traveller focused around a discussion of death. This chapter argues that the Gothic is juxtaposed with folk belief in these works, to underscore that both the peasants’ dvoeverie and educated Russia’s interest in natural sciences, materialist philosophy, and the pseudo-science of spiritualism represent attempts to systematise and explain the unknown. The Gothic mediates the tension between science and faith, the irrational and the prosaic, and the abject and the mysterious, while allowing these ruminations to remain ambiguously unfinalised for the reader.

DepositWHAT SORT OF JEW DOSTOEVSKY LIKED AND DISLIKED: A NARRATIVE OF A LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIP

In his fiction, journalism and letters, Dostoevsky recurrently mentions ethnicity of his protagonists. Russians, Poles, Englishmen, Germans, Turks, Greeks etc. never act as individuals with their personal life but rather as ‘carriers’ of some national idea. Amidst the nations represented in Dostoevsky’s oeuvre, there are some Jews. The fashion of how Dostoevsky portraits them was questionable even at the writer’s lifespan. Arkadii Kovner’s and Sophia Lurie’s letters to Dostoevsky are quite known as well as their direct indictment of the writer in Anti-Semitism. After 1920s, Dostoevsky’s attitude toward Jews turns into a difficult topic of Dostoevsky Studies. In the article, we trace how Dostoevsky uses words which traditionally refer to Jews and show their semantics as highly dispersed. We find the writer’s affinity to use words ‘a Jew’, ‘a Hebrew’ and even ‘an Yid’ with dubious or even without any links to real Jews. Based on private letters of Dostoevsky and his journalism, we derive two Jewish images – positive and negative – which are quite constant in the writer’s texts. Dostoevsky bindingly connects Jews with Judaism, i.e. its practises, traditions and rituals. Thus, he is mostly sympathetic to ‘serious Jews’ – traditionalists. Vice versa, he is rigorously critical to the secular ones. Dostoevsky looks at the polemics of the traditionalists and the ‘maskilim’ and perceives it as a parallel to Russian debates around the Westernization. In the both conflicts, Dostoevsky’s sympathies are with people who keep traditions while he perceives those who decline a ‘national body’ as his own ideological ‘foes’.

DepositŠestaja čast’ kadra”. Vosstanovlenie vertovskogo “Čelovek s kinoapparatom” / “The Sixth of the Frame”. Vertov’s “Man with a Movie Camera” restored.

Outlines the restoration of the Russian film classic “Man with a Movie Camera” (USSR, 1929) by Dziga Vertov which was carried out by the EYE Filmmuseum in Amsterdam between 2008 and 2010. The restoration allows contemporary audiences the possibility to once again experience Vertov’s film as the filmmaker originally intended – or at least in a version that comes as close to this as is nowadays possible. The project has been supervised by senior curator Mark-Paul Meyer, while the author had the chance and pleasure to contribute with archival research.